Flower Gardening

  1. Rustic Harvest Décor from the Garden

    After the leaves have fallen, the well-fortified garden is filled with a wealth of late-season branches, berries, hips, dried grasses and flower heads for rustic fall décor. Early fall is when they are at their brightest and most beautiful for indoor and outdoor decorating. Spring and fall are the best times to plant ornamentals that …

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  2. Growing and Harvesting Everlasting Flowers

    Flowers are nature’s most beautiful and ephemeral gifts to us.  But for gardeners, especially those living in cold-winter climates, the gift is seasonal.  Winter comes, flowers fade, and the bright colors of spring and summer are just a memory.

  3. Tall Sedums for Fall Gardens

    Tall sedums (Sedum spectabile hybrids) look pretty through much of the year—aside from late winter and spring, before they have broken bud. Through summer they provide mounds of lush, blue-green foliage, and in early winter their dried flower heads hold up moderately well before being flattened by snow, but late summer and fall are when …

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  4. Surprise Lilies for Summer and Fall

    Commonly known as “magic lily,” plants in the genus Lycoris are, in fact, much more closely related to amaryllis than to their namesake. But they do bring plenty of magic to the landscape when they open their large funnel-shaped flowers on tall naked stems in mid- to late summer. Several are winter-hardy to boot, creating …

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  5. Rose Rosette Disease Solutions

    Few rose diseases are more dreaded than rose rosette disease. This disfiguring, deadly pathogen can take a perfectly lovely rose from glory to ruin in just a season or two. It’s very easy to identify, but trickier to manage. Thankfully, there are solutions for ardent rose growers.

  6. Luscious Lilies of Late Summer

    Most gardens can use a visual lift in the dog days of late summer.  This is where late-blooming lilies come in.  When their voluptuous, often deliciously scented blooms make their grand entrance in July and August, it’s like a royal fanfare in the landscape.  Goodbye, garden doldrums.

  7. Garden Plants that Feed Soil Naturally

    Nitrogen is one of the most essential plant nutrients, and one of the best ways to boost nitrogen in your soil is to grow nitrogen “fixing” plants. This amazing group of plants naturally add nitrogen into the soil by taking nitrogen from the air and converting it into a usable form in the soil. And …

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  8. The Prettiest Garden Lavenders

    Wands of fragrant purple blooms dance in the wind, feeding bees, and shining cheerfully on even the hottest summer days. These are the flowers of lavender, a plant beloved for its aroma and ability to grow well in tough Mediterranean climates. This aromatic evergreen perennial has been used in perfumes, poultices and potpourris for centuries, …

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  9. Flowers for Coastal Gardens

    The phrase “coastal gardens” evokes a host of memorable images, billowing daisies flanking gray-shingled cottages, bright “dune roses” blooming against an ocean background, or pots of brilliant red geraniums on a wooden pier.  North America has an abundance of coastal areas that are home to a wide array of coastal gardens.

  10. Swallowtail Butterfly Gardening

    Gardeners tend to have a thing for swallowtail butterflies.  Likewise, swallowtails tend to have a thing for certain plants – and certain gardens. The more you incorporate their favorites into your garden, the more they will favor you with their flighty visits.